Who Wants to be a Fairy Tale Princess?

When I was growing up I always wanted to be the prince in the stories. They got to ride horses, fight dragons, and have adventures. Princesses were stuck in towers waiting to be rescued. How boring. In the old fairy tales, princesses lived happily ever after, not because they earned it through their actions, but simply because of who they were. Most of the princesses were passive, waiting to be rescued. They were beautiful, but weak. I had no patience with them. I could never understand why Rapunzel waited in the tower. Why didn’t she cut off her hair, climb down it, and go to town? Luckily, nowadays we have vibrant female characters who drive the action and don’t have to wait around for anyone else to rescue them. I was delighted with Disney’s Tangled, their remake of the Rapunzel story. Now here was a heroine I could root for. Making her hair magical was a brilliant idea. Cutting it made it lose it’s power to heal, taking care of one of the basic problems with the story. If you think about something, you can usually figure out a logical way around a problem. In the new version, Rapunzel had a goal. She wanted to see the dancing lights in the sky. She made a plan and went after it. There were setbacks but she figured out a way to handle them and moved on. In the end, she was willing to sacrifice herself to save the man she loved. She earned her happily ever after ending. It wasn’t given to her. If your main character is female, make sure...

Who Wants to be a Fairy Tale Princess?

When I was growing up I always wanted to be the prince in the stories. They got to ride horses, fight dragons, and have adventures. Princesses were stuck in towers waiting to be rescued. How boring. In the old fairy tales, princesses lived happily ever after, not because they earned it through their actions, but simply because of who they were. Most of the princesses were passive, waiting to be rescued. They were beautiful, but weak. I had no patience with them. I could never understand why Rapunzel waited in the tower. Why didn’t she cut off her hair, climb down it, and go to town? Luckily, nowadays we have vibrant female characters who drive the action and don’t have to wait around for anyone else to rescue them. I was delighted with Disney’s Tangled, their remake of the Rapunzel story. Now here was a heroine I could root for. Making her hair magical was a brilliant idea. Cutting it made it lose it’s power to heal, taking care of one of the basic problems with the story. If you think about something, you can usually figure out a logical way around a problem. In the new version, Rapunzel had a goal. She wanted to see the dancing lights in the sky. She made a plan and went after it. There were setbacks but she figured out a way to handle them and moved on. In the end, she was willing to sacrifice herself to save the man she loved. She earned her happily ever after ending. It wasn’t given to her. If your main character is female, make sure...